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I need some assistance with these assignment.

I need some assistance with these assignment. allegory of the cave and slaughterhouse five Thank you in advance for the help! However, this time, Socrates does not want to go from his “cave” (literal, not metaphorical) to the light: he sees the light in the literal “cave”. In Phaedo, Socrates speaks about captivity in a different sense: people are the prisoners of gods and of their own bodies. In all the three last dialogues, Socrates resembles a descending wise man that is going to be killed by his ignorant counterparts.

2. Both types of blindness result from being unaccustomed to new conditions, but the first leads to the feeling of mastery over the universe, while the second is connected with the clear understanding that the darkness ahead is no progress. In the first case, the prisoner experiences uncertainty. in the second one, the free man deliberately chooses his painful path.

3. The Matrix contains many references to the allegory: first, the image of corridor (the light in the end of the digital corridor when the characters transit between realities. the words of Morpheus “I can only show you the door. you are to walk through”). second, the state of captivity (human beings are turned into batteries, and Morpheus comments: “a slave… born into bondage”). the elusive nature of the slaves’ worldview (“Do You believe in fate, Neo?” – “No… because I am out of the control of my life”. this is the mental projection of your digital self”). last but not least, the pain of the afterlight (“Everybody falls the first time”). Interestingly, this pain also has merely physical nature and results from being unaccustomed: the transition through the mirror and plugs undertakes the grimace of suffering. Neo’s muscles are atrophied. it is also painstaking to master his mind during the kung fu session. Unexpectedly, the movie shares with the dialogues one of the most significant aspects of Ancient Greek philosophy, namely, the belief in fate. But fate is precisely the point in which The Matrix and the allegory differ: in the dialogue, the person who ascends is taken from the cave by chance, while Neo is chosen.

Thank you in advance for the help! However, this time, Socrates does not want to go from his “cave” (literal, not metaphorical) to the light: he sees the light in the literal “cave”. In Phaedo, Socrates speaks about captivity in a different sense: people are the prisoners of gods and of their own bodies. In all the three last dialogues, Socrates resembles a descending wise man that is going to be killed by his ignorant counterparts.

2. Both types of blindness result from being unaccustomed to new conditions, but the first leads to the feeling of mastery over the universe, while the second is connected with the clear understanding that the darkness ahead is no progress. In the first case, the prisoner experiences uncertainty. in the second one, the free man deliberately chooses his painful path.

3. The Matrix contains many references to the allegory: first, the image of corridor (the light in the end of the digital corridor when the characters transit between realities. the words of Morpheus “I can only show you the door. you are to walk through”). second, the state of captivity (human beings are turned into batteries, and Morpheus comments: “a slave… born into bondage”). the elusive nature of the slaves’ worldview (“Do You believe in fate, Neo?” – “No… because I am out of the control of my life”. this is the mental projection of your digital self”). last but not least, the pain of the afterlight (“Everybody falls the first time”). Interestingly, this pain also has merely physical nature and results from being unaccustomed: the transition through the mirror and plugs undertakes the grimace of suffering. Neo’s muscles are atrophied. it is also painstaking to master his mind during the kung fu session. Unexpectedly, the movie shares with the dialogues one of the most significant aspects of Ancient Greek philosophy, namely, the belief in fate. But fate is precisely the point in which The Matrix and the allegory differ: in the dialogue, the person who ascends is taken from the cave by chance, while Neo is chosen.

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