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Hi, I am looking for someone to write an article on proposal on efficiency by design Paper must be at least 500 words. Please, no plagiarized work! Biomimicry: Zimbabwe termite Introduction A typical example of biomimicry is the lesson from the termites on how to create sustainable buildings. Many people believe that termites are just a liability in terms of destroying structures but East gate Building, an office complex in Harare, Zimbabwe, in Africa has a different story.

Termites in a Subterranean termites

(Macrotermes)

Termite exclusive to the Zimbabwe in Africa

Termites build earth structures that maintain the inner temperature because of a particular ventilation system.

They are able to regulate temperatures of 30 degrees C

The termites are constantly tweaking these openings for optimum performance, sometimes adding wet mud that aids cooling with its evaporative effects

Termites have entirely passive structure

They make use of the so-called stack effect, convective airflow from cool to warm

The termites are able to maintain a constant temperature inside despite wide temperature swings outside.

Hydrophilic (water-loving) & hydrophobic (water-repelling) sides

Termites need contact with the soil to survive. They live in underground colonies or in wet areas aboveground.

They build tunnels to reach food and every spring, groups of reproductive termites fly off to start new colonies.

The mounds that they build are extremely durable structures of mud, often employing sophisticated buttressing and, in the case of so-called compass mounds, a precise shape and siting that optimize the effects of the sun.

The fungus combs they cultivate are harvested locally, and transported to the base of the nest.

Termite dens look otherworldly, but they are surprisingly comfortable places to live.

The inner part of a termite den holds steady at a comfortable (to a termite) 87 degrees

A typical example of this scenario is the lesson from the termites on how to create sustainable buildings. Many people believe that termites are just a liability in terms of destroying structures but East gate Building, an office complex in Harare, Zimbabwe, in Africa has a different story. The air conditioning systems in this gate are designed on self-cooling mounds of Macrotermes michaelseni.

The termites maintain their inner nest temperature to within one degree, day and night as the temperatures outside moves from 42 °C to 3 °C (Downton, 407). Through this, there is considerable energy saving and this case presents a good example of bio mimicry and its application. This concept can be applied in many other such structures with the aim of harnessing the activities of the termites to release energy for use in architectural concepts (Florax, et al, 63).

East gate Mound in Zimbambwe.

Works cited

Downton, Paul F. Ecopolis: Architecture and Cities for a Changing Climate. Dordrecht: Springer Science + Business Media, 2008. Print.

Florax, R J. G. M, Groot H. L. F. De, and Peter Mulder. Improving Energy Efficiency Through Technology: Trends, Investment Behaviour and Policy Design. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub, 2011. Internet resource.

Kreider, Jan F, Peter Curtiss, and Ari Rabl. Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Design for Efficiency. Boca Raton: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, 2010. Print.

Spreiregen, Paul D, and Paz B. De. Pre-design. Chicago, IL: Kaplan AEC Architecture, 2005. Print.

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